Malabar Spinach — An Easy-Grow Summer Green That Loves the Heat


By Dr. Mercola Malabar spinach 1,2,3,4 is an interesting alternative to regular spinach. It grows like a perennial jungle vine, and thrives in the summer heat when most other greens tend to turn bitter and dry, easily reaching heights of 10 to 35 feet in a season. Trained on a trellis, with frequent pruning, you can turn it into a decorative edible hedge. Also known under the names Indian, creeping, Asian, Vietnamese, Surinam, Ceylonese and Chinese spinach, Malabar spinach comes in two varieties:5 Basella rubra, which has purple-red vines and pink flowers Basella alba, which has white to pale green stems and white flowers Characteristics The red variety is more visually dramatic, but other than that, it grows and tastes nearly identical to its white counterpart. Full-grown leaves are about the size of your palm, with a slight crunchiness and a hint of lemon-pepper flavor that take on a more characteristic spinach flavor when cooked, although it’s less bitter than regular spinach, th
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/06/23/growing-malabar-spinach.aspx

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Author: vancouverspineanddisccentreblog

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